Baldur’s Gate 3: Can You Avoid Killing Buthir and Grukkoh in BG3?

Buthir and Grukkoh are one of the more intriguing pairs you come across in Baldur's Gate 3 but let them alive is somehow a hard work.

By GamesRecon 9 Min Read

Being my type of player, you’ve probably spent countless hours exploring every nook and cranny of the rich, fantasy universe of Baldur’s Gate 3. But not every twist and turn in this epic RPG feels like a high-stakes drama. Sometimes, things start off with a laugh, only to spiral into a wild ride where you have to suddenly fight for your life. And that’s exactly what we will talk about here.

When you’re wandering around the north part of the Blighted Village, a place teeming with side quests and surprises. Here, you will stumble upon a barn but you will notice that there’s something unusual going on inside. You hear screams, and curiosity gets the better of you. So, what do you do? You pick that lock and step inside, of course.

After entering, you meet Buthir and Grukkoh who are in a bit of a delicate situation. Most times, no matter how you try to chat your way out, these two end up coming at you, weapons blazing. But here’s the situation: what if there’s a way to keep things peaceful? What if you could walk away without a fight, leaving everyone’s dignity – and health bars – intact? This guide walks you through exactly how you can navigate this hilariously awkward encounter without turning it into a battleground.

How to Avoid Conflict with Buthir and Grukkoh in Baldur’s Gate 3

Baldur’s Gate 3 Buthir Conflict

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So you’re in this barn with BG3’s Buthir and Grukkoh looking at you with angry eyes. You may think, “Do I really have to fight these two?” Good news: you don’t have to! There are a couple of slick moves you can pull to keep everyone comfortable and avoid turning this into a brawl.

First off, the simplest strategy? Just don’t go into the barn. I know it sounds like a cop-out, but if you never open that door, you never stumble into this awkward lovers’ quarrel. It’s like they say, “out of sight, out of mind.” Additionally, Shadowheart might give you a nod for leaving the game’s nature to do its thing.

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But let’s say you’re curious and you do open that barn door. The conversation that kicks off can be your best choice to keep that peace. It all depends on your character’s charm and wit. Like, if you’re playing a Bard, you’ve got some dialogue options that can eliminate the tense environment. By saying something like, “Do carry on. There’s Bookshops in Baldur’s Gate that’d pay well for this kind of smut.” If you can pull off a 15 dice roll skill check, you’re in the clear.

On the other end, let’s say you’re more of the intimidating type, like a Berserker Barbarian. Grukkoh asks what you’re doing there, and you’ve got this bold replay: “I am laughing at your puny rutting.” It’s a gamble, needing a dice roll of 15. When Grukkoh realizes your character is making fun of him, he’ll be so taken aback that he’ll declare the moment is ruined; he leaves, and you’re left there.

Having a talk with Buthir in BG3

Escaping the Fight

Now, if things do start to heat up and weapons are about to be drawn after you have opened the door, don’t sweat it. You can always just high-tail it out of there.

Keep in mind that being bold isn’t always the best course of action – sometimes, the smart move is to beat a hasty retreat. But in Baldur’s Gate 3, you can’t just turn tail and run – you’ve got to be strategic about your exit.

Once things start heating up in the barn, here’s what you do: you use your spells, but not to attack. You’re going to use them to create a distraction or slow down your barn buddies. Think of spells that can disorient or hinder them – anything that gives you a leg up in making your great escape.

For example, a well-timed Blind spell could be just the trick; cast it on both Buthir and Grukkoh, and suddenly, they’re swinging at shadows while you’re slipping out the door. Keep moving, stay out of their reach, and soon enough, you’ll be out of combat mode. And just like that, you’ve turned a potential fight to the death into a sneaky escape. No harm, no foul – you leave with your health at peak, and Buthir and Grukkoh in Baldur’s Gate 3 get to carry on with… whatever they were doing.

Escape or Kill Buthir: The Consequences of Choices

In Baldur’s Gate 3, every choice you make is like a pebble in a pond – it ripples out and affects your game in ways big and small. So, what happens when you decide to let Buthir and Grukkoh live or, you know the other way, not so nice?

Scenario one – you’re the peacemaker: You either avoid the barn altogether, talk your way out of a fight, or make a sneaky exit. What’s the outcome? For starters, you get to pat yourself on the back for not turning a lovers’ tiff into a bloodbath. You will have no guilt, and that’s got to count for something in a game where choices matter. But let’s talk loot, or rather, the lack of it. If you go the non-violent route, you will not receive any items to fill your inventory. You walk away with your full stamina and your morals intact, but your inventory stays a bit lighter.

Now, flip the script: Let’s say you decide to go full warrior mode and take Buthir and Grukkoh down. What’s in it for you? Besides the thrill of victory, you get a good loot drop including 3 Gold and 1 Bone, alongside 50 Experience Points.

But is it worth it? Do you go for the loot and experience, or do you take the high road and keep your hands clean? It’s a classic RPG dilemma and that’s the beauty of BG3, your choices shape your adventure. They can make you a hero, a villain, or something in between. So, what’s it going to be? Are you the sword-swinging treasure hunter or the peace-loving adventurer? It’s up to you what you should do.

In the end, Baldur’s Gate 3 asks you to not just play a game but to think about the kind of hero you want to be. It’s a journey of swords and sorcery, sure, but it’s also an adventure of self-discovery. So, what will your legacy be in the Forgotten Realms? The choice, as always, is yours.

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